Tag Archive: St. Ignace Michigan


Both Novels Available in paperback and electronic formats

Both Novels Available in paperback and electronic formats

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Just had to add the latest boat we saw this past weekend docked at St. Ignace.

Fastest boat yet

This belongs to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

In the last post we wondered which of the protective services had the fastest boat.

Take a look at these on the stern.

Homeland Security power

This boat will be very important to the story in Book Three

of the Mackinac Trilogy.

Mackinac Beidge from Lower Peninsula

You can’t truly experience Northern Michigan without crossing the “Gateway to the Upper

Peninsula” – the Mackinac Bridge, and visitors to Mackinac Island miss out

if they don’t visit St. Ignace and enjoy this historic town’s natural harbor.

A sailboat enters the St. Ignace harbor with Mackinac Island in the distance beyond.
A sailboat enters the St. Ignace harbor with Mackinac Island in the distance beyond.

For centuries, Native Americans, French, British and, of course, our own citizens have enjoyed the beauty of St. Ignace’s natural harbor of refuge. After crossing the bridge, visitors turn east toward town.  The road makes a curve to the left and goes downhill, opening to the most amazing vista ahead – the aquamarine waters of Lake Huron, wrapped on three sides by a pristine harbor – St. Ignace.  Chief’s office looks out on the bay and he often hitches a ride to the island on the Coast Guard boats or the local ferries.

Star Line Ferry skims by the St. Ignace Marina

A Star Line Ferry skims by the St. Ignace Marina

The Mackinac Bridge provides a marvelous panorama of the Straits of Mackinac and lakes Michigan

and Huron. Freighters are often seen passing underneath and Mackinac Island gleams to the east.

Mackinac Bridge near fort

Up until now, “tweets” consisted of the sweet call of birds in Brighton,

Brevort and Mackinac.

But as the excitement built as we crossed the Mackinac Bridge this weekend,

I realized why some folks “tweet.”

I just wanted to share the thrill with all those who love Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

and Mackinac Island.

So here is a photo taken while driving on the bridge.

To follow my Tweets (there won’t be many, I promise)

you can go to this Twitter address and follow me:

https://twitter.com/BrightonAuthor

It snowed 15 minutes after we crossed into St. Ignace.

It snowed 15 minutes after we crossed into St. Ignace.

This is the address for this particular posting.

https://twitter.com/BrightonAuthor/status/332258719737991169/photo/1

Even though it snowed a little yesterday, May 12th, at Mackinac,

the ferry boats are all out of dry dock now and

busy taking visitors and residents back and forth

from both St. Ignace and Mackinac City.

Photo Stitched Catmarans

This photo was taken several winters ago in St. Ignace.

Actually, it is three photos “stitched” together.

Word is that a certain young family cruised over to Mackinac this weekend

and their sailboat was the only one in the harbor.

Mackinac sailboat first

This photo was taken last year, when they also were the first to dock at the island.

Nothing better than an early glimpse of Mackinac in spring.

A Quiet Lane

Tawny’s grandparents’, the Randolphs, like many others on the island,

first lived there as summer residents.  They purchased a small

Victorian cottage down a quiet village lane such as pictured above.

The family enjoyed weekends and summer vacations there,

while their real home was in St. Ignace, where their son, Roy,

Tawny’s father, attended school.

But after Mr. Randolph retired, he winterized the

cottage and created a beautiful year-round home.

Tawny always loved visiting them and when her mother was

temporarily transferred to Germany, Tawny was thrilled to move in.

Of course that meant she had to attend the small high school on

the island. Little did she know how what an amazing and, sadly,

threatening future she faced.

And so the story begins…..

St. Ignace Sunset

St. Ignace’s yacht harbor is easily seen from a distance now that a

new lighthouse is installed at the end of the public pier.

The city itself is important to the novel. Chief’s Tribal Police Station is located north of St. Ignace.

When Chief travels to visit Tawny’s mother, Laura, on the island, he either takes the Star Line ferry or

hitches a ride on the Coast Guard’s launch.

.St  Ignace Light Star Line boat

In this photo, the Star Line ferry leaves the Railroad Dock and turns toward the Main Dock.

The landscape of St. Ignace changed forever in the predawn hours of August 3rd, 2012.

 The foundation of the old railroad track elevator for the rail ferry “Chief Wawatam”

(seen on the left side of this photo) gave way and

left a pile of iron and timber rubble in its wake.

It was a distinguishing feature and historical remnant on the city’s waterfront. The actual

historical figure, Chief Wawatam, and his heroic actions are mentioned in the novel.

In honor of a very special 16-year old’s birthday, (That’s you. Tillie), the novel Discovered – The Cross of Lorraine is officially available at Amazon.com.

SEE: http://www.amazon.com/Discovered-The-Cross-Lorraine-Volume/dp/1475176333

Think of a modern day Nancy Drew type of heroine, add the excitement and suspense of hidden treasure such as in National Treasure, set the novel in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and Mackinac Island, incorporate Native American heroes – and unite them in one intense love story, and you begin to sense the nature of this novel.

PLEASE SCROLL down through all the past postings on this blog to get more of a sense of the novel’s setting and plot.

Discovered - Book Cover

FOR MUCH MORE INFORMATION ON THE NOVEL AND TO ORDER IT, PLEASE VISIT:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=Discovered+-+The+Cross+of+Lorraine

Discovered - Back Cover