Category: Romance


Both Novels Available in paperback and electronic formats

Both Novels Available in paperback and electronic formats

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Grand Hotel

Grand Hotel

Every day seems like the 4th of July at Mackinac Island’s Grand Hotel.

A line of flags stand at attention along the “longest porch in the world.”

The total length is 660 feet (200 m).

Porch Chairs at Grand Hotel

The patriotic theme is enhanced with bright red geraniums punctuating the glistening

white colors of the hotel, porch chairs, flower boxes and railings.

Grand Hotel Carriage

When it came to designing the cover of Discovered – The Cross of Lorraine there was no question.

The Grand Hotel HAD to be on the cover!

Grand Hotel from speedboat

Lining up the Round Island Lighthouse with the Grand required

boating out to a good vantage point and trying not to bounce the camera

while ferry waves tossed the bow rider in choppy waters.

Star Line Ferry Enters the Picture

Tawny’s favorite – the Star Line ferry  – happened to cruise by during the photo shoot.

The secret to taking these shots on a rocking boat? Experienced sea legs and

setting the camera for “action shots.”

The June 27th edition of the weekly St. Ignace News featured

Discovered – the Cross of Lorraine.

If you double click on the image below,

You just might be able to read it.

The reporter did a nice job. Hope the potential audience saw it!

St. Ignace News Story

Arnold Dock During Races

When entering the Mackinac Island’s harbor, visitors are immediately drawn to the historic

barns on the Arnold Dock. Iconic reminders of Mackinac’s rich past, the barns are very

much in use today. Invariably, at least one horse drawn wagon will be pulled up along side,

as merchandise is loaded or unloaded.

Horse drawn Wagon at Arnold Dock

In the novel Discovered – The Cross of Lorraine, Takoda’s workshop is located

in a historic barn out on the old Coal Dock.

Entance to Arnold Dock

The Grand Hotel, Ft. Mackinac and the Arnold Dock are probably the most prominent

and priceless structures on the island and we’re fortunate that they are well-preserved

and cared for by their owners and protected by the City of Mackinac.

Mackinac Harbor at night

 

Approach to Arnold Docks

Mackinac Island Shoreline Docks

While reading “Discovered – the Cross of Lorraine” some fans have had

difficulty picturing the coal dock where Takoda has his workshop.  The above photo

focuses on the Arnold Dock below Fort Mackinac. The coal dock is to the left, just out of sight.

View of coal dock in winter

This winter shot was taken from the Arnold Dock – looking toward the Coal Dock.

Of course it is all fiction, but this was an ideal spot for Takoda’s boat restoration

business since it is isolated, near the hardware store and wonderful boats

have actually been restored there.

Coal Dock

In 2005, extensive restoration of the Coal Dock began. Built before 1910, possibly as early

as 1860, the Coal Dock was aptly named, since coal used by residents was unloaded there

as well as hay, firewood and barreled fish. It was owned by the Arnold Line system for more

than 100 years, but before that belonged to Captain James Bennett and was known as

Bennett’s Wharf.

It is one of the most attractive sites on the waterfront and deserves preservation so that all visitors

throughout the coming years can enjoy seeing such a beautiful remnant of Mackinac’s past.

Handcrafted

The stern of one of the gorgeous wooden boats handcrafted at the Coal Dock barn.

Photos of the Arnold Dock will be featured in the next posting.

Mackinac Beidge from Lower Peninsula

You can’t truly experience Northern Michigan without crossing the “Gateway to the Upper

Peninsula” – the Mackinac Bridge, and visitors to Mackinac Island miss out

if they don’t visit St. Ignace and enjoy this historic town’s natural harbor.

A sailboat enters the St. Ignace harbor with Mackinac Island in the distance beyond.
A sailboat enters the St. Ignace harbor with Mackinac Island in the distance beyond.

For centuries, Native Americans, French, British and, of course, our own citizens have enjoyed the beauty of St. Ignace’s natural harbor of refuge. After crossing the bridge, visitors turn east toward town.  The road makes a curve to the left and goes downhill, opening to the most amazing vista ahead – the aquamarine waters of Lake Huron, wrapped on three sides by a pristine harbor – St. Ignace.  Chief’s office looks out on the bay and he often hitches a ride to the island on the Coast Guard boats or the local ferries.

Star Line Ferry skims by the St. Ignace Marina

A Star Line Ferry skims by the St. Ignace Marina

The Mackinac Bridge provides a marvelous panorama of the Straits of Mackinac and lakes Michigan

and Huron. Freighters are often seen passing underneath and Mackinac Island gleams to the east.

Mackinac Bridge near fort

Mudminnow Press

Independent publisher located on the Keweenaw Peninsula

bahamiantrek

Homeschooling family on an adventure of a lifetime